Lenzing Launches First Filament Fiber, Tencel Luxe

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The Lenzing Group has introduced its first filament fiber called Tencel Luxe, marking the third fiber the company has launched this year after Refibra and EcoVero.

Lenzing said the Tencel Luxe branded lyocell filament is another key milestone in the implementation of the company’s sCore TEN strategy and will further support Lenzing’s shift to become a true specialty player in the cellulosic materials market consisting of fibers derived from sustainable wood sources.

Tencel Luxe sustainable cellulose filament fiber is meant to offer luxury aesthetics, performance and comfort that allows it to be blended with other noble fibers such as silk, cashmere or wool. The smooth surface of the Tencel Luxe filament gives fabrics a silky feel and flowing drape. Tencel Luxe filaments are also naturally breathable due to their wood-based origin and offer strong color fastness, enabling designers to express bold color palettes.

Tencel Luxe botanic lyocell filaments are made from wood pulp sourced from sustainable wood in line with Lenzing’s strict Wood and Pulp Policy. They are produced using Lenzing’s closed-loop lyocell production process, which has received the European Award for the Environment from the European Union. This process ensures minimal environmental impact due to low process water, energy use and raw materials consumption.

“We are committed to setting industry standards in order to enhance the protection of our environment, while making filaments for fabrics that are designed to appeal to the most sophisticated consumers,” said Stefan Doboczky, chief executive officer of the Lenzing Group. “The launch of Tencel Luxe is a further sign of our ongoing commitment toward innovation and sustainability.”

Lenzing said Tencel Luxe will open new markets for the company and for its customers and partners, and will allow the company to participate in the premium segment of the fabrics market.

Tencel Luxe will be produced at the Lenzing site in Austria. Lenzing plans to expand the capacity at this site over the coming years and has started the basic engineering for a large scale commercial line for filaments.

[Read more about Lenzing fibers: Lenzing Launches EcoVero Fiber, Gets High Marks From Canopy]

“The decision for the Lenzing site in Austria as a hub for Tencel Luxe helps to build up a strong knowledge base for this new technology at the headquarters of the company,” says Heiko Arnold, chief technology officer of the Lenzing Group. “Here we can fully leverage the proximity between operations, research and development, customer service and the engineering organization to accelerate the development of this technology for the production of Tencel Luxe on a bigger industrial scale.”

Decisions about a new plant for the production of Tencel Luxe on a bigger industrial scale will be made in the third quarter of 2018.

In May, Lenzing rolled out EcoVero branded viscose fibers with a high sustainability quotient, while Refibra, introduced in February, is an innovative fiber made from cotton scraps and wood, and the first cellulose fiber featuring recycled material to be offered on a commercial scale.

For the first half of the year, Lenzing’s revenue rose 11 percent to $1.36 billion, as earnings increased 38.8% to $320 million.

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