AlgiKnit Wins National Geographic Award for Kelp-Based Textiles

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AlgiKnit
Photo credit: FIT

AlgiKnit is shaking up the apparel and textile industry with its revolutionary and circular concept–a fabric made from kelp.

Last month AlgiKnit topped the Sustainable Planet category of National Geographic’s Chasing Genius Challenge and was granted $25,000 for its innovative environmental idea. As a groundbreaking digital initiative, the Chasing Genius Challenge fosters creative thinking to combat some of the world’s most pressing issues—including pollution.

AlgiKnit was launched in response to mounting apparel and textile pollution. Based on a circular economy approach that highlights biomaterial innovation, natural dye practices and ecological intelligence, AlgiKnit’s textile concept could help businesses reduce their carbon footprint. The textile’s kelp-based composition would provide a more sustainable alternative to conventional agricultural or man-made fabrics— including those that contain cotton or polyester. The hope, according to AlgiKnit, is that this fabric could provide an eco-friendly, bio-based textile solution for apparel and footwear brands.

[Read more on sustainable material innovations: Lessons Learned From Silkworms Could Improve Future Synthetic Material Production]

“We are blown away by and really proud of the scope of ideas submitted, as well as in the engagement of the community both on and off our platforms,” National Geographic EVP of brand partnerships Brendan Ripp said. “We look forward to announcing the next challenge, and continuing to stay true to our brand with platforms that enable change in the world.”

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